experchange > solaris

Abandoned Trolley (04-18-19, 09:47 PM)
hi there

I have removed the NVRAM chip from my Ultra 60 and managed the surgery
required to get a lithium battery piggybacked on to it.

It seems to have worked, and now I can reboot the machine and it
remembers the date and time. Solaris 10 gets up and runs but as you can
probably guess, the MAC address is completely blank, and I cannot get
the network to run at all.

Does anybody know of an idiots guide to the business of reprogramming
the chip with some sort of (presumably dummy) MAC address ?

Also, I am assuming that the on-board ethernet port has its MAC address
held on the NVRAM, which explains the current situation, but ....
I have a couple of Sun SCSI adapter cards which have ethernet ports on
them, and I have used these ethernet ports in the Ultra 60 before - but
now if I insert one of them, the card is recognised, but the MAC address
for it is also blank - so where is the MAC address for the card stored ?

AT
ted (Ted Nolan (04-18-19, 10:19 PM)
In article <q9ak99$kob$1>,
Abandoned Trolley <russell> wrote:
[..]
>now if I insert one of them, the card is recognised, but the MAC address
>for it is also blank - so where is the MAC address for the card stored ?
>AT


Haven't done it with Solaris 10, but iirc, with earlier versions, you could
set the ether address with ifconfig.

I did that once to switch in a Sun instead of the router our ISP provided.
Unfortunately they later plugged that router in somewhere else on their
network..
Abandoned Trolley (04-18-19, 10:47 PM)
On 18/04/2019 21:19, Ted Nolan <tednolan> wrote:
> In article <q9ak99$kob>,
> Abandoned Trolley <russell> wrote:
> Haven't done it with Solaris 10, but iirc, with earlier versions, you could
> set the ether address with ifconfig.
> I did that once to switch in a Sun instead of the router our ISP provided.
> Unfortunately they later plugged that router in somewhere else on their
> network..


I have used ifconfig to set the IP address, and it is accepted, but it
appears unwilling to let me set the MAC address.

Maybe I have been doing something wrong, but if anybody knows of the
exact syntax to use then I don't mind giving it a try.

I was under the impression that the NVRAM needs to be modified though ?

AT
ted (Ted Nolan (04-18-19, 11:19 PM)
In article <q9anof$9jo$1>,
Abandoned Trolley <russell> wrote:
>On 18/04/2019 21:19, Ted Nolan <tednolan> wrote:
>I have used ifconfig to set the IP address, and it is accepted, but it
>appears unwilling to let me set the MAC address.
>Maybe I have been doing something wrong, but if anybody knows of the
>exact syntax to use then I don't mind giving it a try.
>I was under the impression that the NVRAM needs to be modified though ?
>AT


At one time you could definitely spoof the ether address and override
the 8:0:20:x:x:x builtin MAC.

Maybe something like

ifconfig hme0 ether 1:2:3:4:5:6

I can't test it now without losing contact with my remote sun box if it works.
Doug McIntyre (04-19-19, 12:28 AM)
Abandoned Trolley <russell> writes:
>I have removed the NVRAM chip from my Ultra 60 and managed the surgery
>required to get a lithium battery piggybacked on to it.


>It seems to have worked, and now I can reboot the machine and it
>remembers the date and time. Solaris 10 gets up and runs but as you can
>probably guess, the MAC address is completely blank, and I cannot get
>the network to run at all.


>Does anybody know of an idiots guide to the business of reprogramming
>the chip with some sort of (presumably dummy) MAC address ?


This should still work



>Also, I am assuming that the on-board ethernet port has its MAC address
>held on the NVRAM, which explains the current situation, but ....
>I have a couple of Sun SCSI adapter cards which have ethernet ports on
>them, and I have used these ethernet ports in the Ultra 60 before - but
>now if I insert one of them, the card is recognised, but the MAC address
>for it is also blank - so where is the MAC address for the card stored ?


Early ethernet networking standards had the BIA address as unique per
station, and it was set to use the same BIA on all the different
ethernet segments that your station would be on.
Thus this is Sun's (and other's) implementation of that, where the
boot code would take the BIA out of the NVRAM, and set it on all the
cards installed in the system.

It was unthinkinable that you'd have multiple NICs on the same segment
from the same station. The only point in having multiple ethernet NICs
was to talk directly to your other network segments. VLANs were far
far off, let alone LAGs, or other fun that came later.

Thus, the NVRAM holds the BIA address of *all* the NICs for your Sun.

The modern standards with the BIA address being unique per NIC came
much later than most of Sun's history (that granted, they probably kept on
long after they should have).

But the above guide in one of the incantations should let you get into
the OBP NVRAM programming mode.
Abandoned Trolley (11-11-19, 10:17 PM)
On 18/04/2019 20:47, Abandoned Trolley wrote:
[..]
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
>


I left this one alone for a long time, mainly because I managed to get
the thing working in a fashion.

The NVRAM seems to keep hold of the date and time but not a lot more, so
I just fired it up and used ifconfig to feed it an ethernet address and
the other network details, and left it running. It seems happy enough
for weeks on end.

When I did get some time to look in to it a bit further I managed to
enter the programming mode, but any time I tried to enter some data,
there was an error message saying "Fast Data Access MMU miss" or
something of the sort - any suggestions ?

AT
Chris (11-12-19, 03:30 AM)
On 11/11/19 20:17, Abandoned Trolley wrote:
[..]
> there was an error message saying "Fast Data Access MMU miss" or
> something of the sort - any suggestions ?
> AT


Sun machines of that vintage have a single mac address, irrespective
og the number of hardware interfaces. Quite easy to program that
into the machine using obp. Don't have a link, but search for
sun nvram faq, which has all the gory details...

Chris
Abandoned Trolley (11-15-19, 01:44 PM)
On 12/11/2019 01:30, Chris wrote:
> On 11/11/19 20:17, Abandoned Trolley wrote:
> Sun machines of that vintage have a single mac address, irrespective
> og the number of hardware interfaces. Quite easy to program that
> into the machine using obp. Don't have a link, but search for
> sun nvram faq, which has all the gory details...
> Chris


I dare say it is "Quite easy to program that into the machine using obp"
- but as I said, any time I tried to enter some data, there was an error
message saying "Fast Data Access MMU miss"

AT
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