experchange > asm

Rod Pemberton (11-06-18, 01:47 AM)
This software company Snafu made me laugh really long and hard ...

<OT off-topic>

"Do you guys not have phones?," said Wyatt Cheng, Principal Game
Designer at Blizzard Entertainment, to a bunch of hardcore, PC gaming
fanatics who love to play the PC game Diablo, and who spend many
thousands of dollars on high-performance gaming PCs, because
smartphones just can't hack it ... Apparently, the next installment of
the Diablo game series, i.e., "Diablo Immortal", is going to be
made /only/ for smartphones.

ROFL. It's like downgrading from a Cray to a Commodore 64. The last
computer game I played was Quake3 Arena. Still, that's pricelessly
clueless. They have no idea - or just no longer care - who their core
audience is. OMG, IRL wiping away tears from laughter ... Clearly,
they're jealous of the profit that's being made from smartphone games.

It seems that Elon Musk's comment below fits ...

Rod Pemberton
Rick C. Hodgin (11-06-18, 08:18 PM)
On Monday, November 5, 2018 at 6:45:30 PM UTC-5, Rod Pemberton wrote:
[..]
> audience is. OMG, IRL wiping away tears from laughter ... Clearly,
> they're jealous of the profit that's being made from smartphone games.
> It seems that Elon Musk's comment below fits ...


Perhaps they're seeking another audience. Smartphones are the
future. Gaming PCs are not. And even so, it's not like the game
they have today, the one that's already working, will be going
away. They'll probably still support it in moving forward.

Maybe they're using that source of revenue (from gaming PCs) as
the fuel to reach their true desire, which is mobile technology.
Maybe they never had any designs on the PC gaming market.

You laugh at someone, Rod. It may be unjustifiable laughter.
Smartphones are the future. They will only be getting more and
more ubiquitous, and more and more powerful.

The gaming PC will become a pigeonholed niche for a very small
and specific market as regular everyday smartphones become more
and more like the Ninetendo Switch, able to be plugged in to a
base to present onto your TV all the gaming experience you'll
ever need.

My son has a Nintendo Switch, and we hooked it up to a projector
on his bedroom wall (all white) and I brought in some good speak-
ers, a sub-woofer, and he played that little game up there on the
big screen ... and it was one of the most amazing things I've
ever seen.

These mobile devices are most definitely the future. I think
the last laugh will be on your line of thinking.
Davs (11-07-18, 02:08 AM)
Another lookout of near machine language programming, As of date smartphones hardware are more advance in the early 90's computer. but software are slow in speed compared to the early 90's.

Virtual?
Rod Pemberton (11-07-18, 09:44 AM)
On Tue, 6 Nov 2018 10:18:23 -0800 (PST)
"Rick ...." <rick> wrote:

> On Monday, November 5, 2018 at 6:45:30 PM UTC-5, Rod Pemberton wrote:


> Perhaps they're seeking another audience.
> Smartphones are the future.


I would argue that they've peaked already, at least for the developed
world. I doubt we'll see much more advancement, other than more speed
and more memory and bigger screens, as they've packed just about every
conceivable digital device into a smartphone already ... What's left?

AISI, it's plausible that the next generation or the one thereafter
might not even support voice communications. I.e., it won't be a phone
at all anymore. It'll be a general, all purpose, digital multi-tool,
but without the less used capabilities, e.g., phone etc, to reduce
costs and make space for more memory/storage and a bigger processor.
Who uses a smartphone to make voice phone calls anymore? ...

> Gaming PCs are not.


They've always been a niche market, but gaming PCs aren't going away
any time soon as long as smartphones are many orders of magnitude
slower. Some countries, e.g., South Korea, are absolutely fanatical
about PC game play, i.e., video games.

> The gaming PC will become a pigeonholed niche for a very small
> and specific market as regular everyday smartphones become more
> and more like the Ninetendo Switch, able to be plugged in to a
> base to present onto your TV all the gaming experience you'll
> ever need.
> My son has a Nintendo Switch, and we hooked it up to a projector
> on his bedroom wall (all white) and I brought in some good speak-
> ers, a sub-woofer, and he played that little game up there on the
> big screen ... and it was one of the most amazing things I've
> ever seen.


a) Why wouldn't you just connect a regular computer up to a projector
so that he could play many more computer games?

With a standard x86 PC you can play just about every game in existence,
except recent high-end games. You can play nearly all PC games,
including non-IBM clone PC games, and also all arcade games via the
MAME arcade game and computer emulator:



If you type "MAME demo" into Youtube, a half hour sample video of
available arcade games comes up. That's just the first video. Many of
these either demo a specific game on MAME or an arcade machine setup
using MAME.



> These mobile devices are most definitely the future.


b) What's the point of it being a mobile device, if it's no longer
mobile?

You effectively turned a mobile device into an immobilized mobile
device by hooking it up to a projector and speakers, no different than
a standard PC with a big monitor.

At the start of this year, monitors were available up to 49 inches,
which is near the lower end size of a projector, e.g., 30 inches to 350
inches.

> I think the last laugh will be on your line of thinking.


You're effectively claiming that smartphones will replace computers.

That's possible in certain areas as they become faster, but the
same can be said of tablets too. We no longer generally use
standalone calculators, instead using a PC or smartphone app, but you
can still buy them, from a few dollars to $250 or so for the high-end
scientific and graphing calculators. There will always be corporations
that prefer PCs for work, and home users that prefer them to slower and
less usable devices.

c) Who is going to carry around a smartphone with a 36 inch or
larger screen?

That's far larger than most tablets.

Recently, I saw some of my relatives having difficulty holding on to
their new smartphones with super-sized screens, e.g., maybe 6 inch x 3
inch. Women can throw it into their purse, but guys have to wear a
leather holster ... (not joking)

You also can't walk around cities wearing VR goggles like you can
wearing earbuds. People died when they introduced earbuds because they
were walking into traffic. People died after smartphones by walking
into traffic too and also from falling off things while taking selfies.
Can you imagine the deaths from mobile VR googles? ...

I.e., they've got a ways to go yet to integrate this stuff into general
life in a way that would eliminate the usefulness and effectiveness and
powerfulness of a full-sized PC.

Rod Pemberton
Bernhard Schornak (11-07-18, 01:29 PM)
Davs wrote:

> Virtual?


HLL (huge, long-winded, lame)... ;)

Greetings from Augsburg

Bernhard Schornak
Rick C. Hodgin (11-07-18, 07:04 PM)
On Wednesday, November 7, 2018 at 2:42:19 AM UTC-5, Rod Pemberton wrote:
> On Tue, 6 Nov 2018 "Rick ...." <rick> wrote:
> I would argue that they've peaked already, at least for the developed
> world. I doubt we'll see much more advancement, other than more speed
> and more memory and bigger screens, as they've packed just about every
> conceivable digital device into a smartphone already ... What's left?


That's just it. More and more features, the ability to integrate
with more traditional hardware. The goal is a device you carry
with you that is your desktop machine, and you simply plug it in
to peripherals to display outwardly what it's computing inwardly.

> Who uses a smartphone to make voice phone calls anymore? ...


Everyone.
Robert Wessel (11-09-18, 07:41 AM)
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 02:44:35 -0500, Rod Pemberton
<invalid> wrote:
>AISI, it's plausible that the next generation or the one thereafter
>might not even support voice communications. I.e., it won't be a phone
>at all anymore. It'll be a general, all purpose, digital multi-tool,
>but without the less used capabilities, e.g., phone etc, to reduce
>costs and make space for more memory/storage and a bigger processor.
>Who uses a smartphone to make voice phone calls anymore? ...


There's not really all that much in a smartphone that actually
specific to being a phone. The network protocol mostly lost phone
specific function with G4, and other that the position of the speaker
and microphone (which are going to be there anyway) to facilitate use
as a handset, it's just software.
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