experchange > linux.networking

Grant Taylor (11-01-18, 08:42 PM)
The following page came across my Twitter feed last night and I thought
it was an extremely good introduction / overview of some of Linux's
network interface types.

Link - Introduction to Linux interfaces for virtual networking
-


It covers / introduces the following interface types:

· Bridge
· Bonded interface
· Team device
· VLAN (Virtual LAN) · VXLAN (Virtual eXtensible Local Area Network)
· MACVLAN
· IPVLAN
· MACVTAP/IPVTAP
· MACsec (Media Access Control Security)
· VETH (Virtual Ethernet)
· VCAN (Virtual CAN)
· VXCAN (Virtual CAN tunnel)
· IPOIB (IP-over-InfiniBand)
· NLMON (NetLink MONitor)
· Dummy interface
· IFB (Intermediate Functional Block)

I routinely use 6 of the 15 interface types.
Tristan B. Kildaire (12-27-18, 11:57 AM)
On Thu, 01 Nov 2018 12:42:07 -0600, Grant Taylor wrote:

[..]
> · NLMON (NetLink MONitor)
> · Dummy interface · IFB (Intermediate Functional Block)
> I routinely use 6 of the 15 interface types.


Oh wow, thanks for posting this. As someone who has gotten into
networking beginning this year this will be helpful.
Grant Taylor (12-27-18, 08:31 PM)
On 12/27/18 2:57 AM, Tristan B. Kildaire wrote:
> Oh wow, thanks for posting this. As someone who has gotten into networking
> beginning this year this will be helpful.


You're welcome.

I will say that I think much of the page is more advanced network
interfaces. I think a good working understanding of networking,
particularly IP routing and bridging work, is a very good thing.

Trying to dive into virtual interfaces without a foundation is probably
going to slow things down.

That being said, feel free to ask questions, here or via email, if you
want to talk. I'm happy to share.
Jorgen Grahn (12-29-18, 12:37 PM)
On Thu, 2018-12-27, Grant Taylor wrote:
> On 12/27/18 2:57 AM, Tristan B. Kildaire wrote:
>> Oh wow, thanks for posting this. As someone who has gotten into networking
>> beginning this year this will be helpful.

> You're welcome.
> I will say that I think much of the page is more advanced network
> interfaces.


And /exotic/ interfaces. To me[0], a network interface is almost
always something that's attached to an Ethernet (where neighbor
discovery, broadcast and so on works), which you can assign IP
addresses to (or have addresses assigned to).

The best way to understand and use the interface types in the article
is, IMO, to understand ordinary Ethernet interfaces: their features,
and what makes it possible to have IP networking on top of them.

> I think a good working understanding of networking, particularly IP
> routing and bridging work, is a very good thing.
> Trying to dive into virtual interfaces without a foundation is probably
> going to slow things down.
> That being said, feel free to ask questions, here or via email, if you
> want to talk. I'm happy to share.


/Jorgen

[0] Who don't use VMs and containers a lot, and primarily work with
the IP endpoints rather than with networking infrastructure.
(12-31-18, 12:18 AM)
Grant Taylor <gtaylor> wrote:
[..]
> ? Dummy interface
> ? IFB (Intermediate Functional Block)
> I routinely use 6 of the 15 interface types.

Thanks for the post. Heloful.
(01-01-19, 08:26 PM)
Grant Taylor <gtaylor> wrote:
[..]
> ? Dummy interface
> ? IFB (Intermediate Functional Block)
> I routinely use 6 of the 15 interface types.

Yeah I agree on that. I only really taught myself networking this year including routing which is really fun and I will be going back to it later on on more depth but I made some successful strides with it and enjoy it quite a lot. I agree without the funamdetals all of the things listed in this page will nto make sense really.
(01-01-19, 08:26 PM)
Grant Taylor <gtaylor> wrote:
[..]
> ? Dummy interface
> ? IFB (Intermediate Functional Block)
> I routinely use 6 of the 15 interface types.

Also thanks. If I have any questions then I will post em here.
Grant Taylor (01-05-19, 11:55 PM)
On 12/29/18 3:37 AM, Jorgen Grahn wrote:
> And /exotic/ interfaces.


I think "exotic" is likely an appropriate description.

> To me[0], a network interface is almost always something that's attached
> to an Ethernet (where neighbor discovery, broadcast and so on works),


I'll agree to "/almost/ always". There are MANY different types of
network interfaces that aren't Ethernet. I'm guessing the most common
is PPP, either dial up or over Ethernet. PPP is still it's own
interface and protocol.

> which you can assign IP addresses to (or have addresses assigned to).


It's also possible to use something other than Internet Protocol (either
v4 or v6). MPLS is becoming more and more popular.

> The best way to understand and use the interface types in the article
> is, IMO, to understand ordinary Ethernet interfaces: their features,
> and what makes it possible to have IP networking on top of them.


I absolutely agree. The "exotic" nature of many of the interfaces in
the article are really creating virtual Ethernet like interfaces or
otherwise playing with the nature of how Ethernet behaves. Most of them
are in fact /exotic/ Ethernet.

> [0] Who don't use VMs and containers a lot, and primarily work with the
> IP endpoints rather than with networking infrastructure.


VLANs (as in 802.1Q) and bonds are (more) common on servers (than some
other exotic things). ;-)
Rob van der Putten (01-07-19, 09:17 PM)
Hi there

On 05/01/2019 22:55, Grant Taylor wrote:

<Cut>

> VLANs (as in 802.1Q) and bonds are (more) common on servers (than some
> other exotic things).  ;-)


The WAN link to my ISP is PPPoE in VLAN 6. They support baby jumbo [1],
so my IP MTU is 1500.
Apparently this type type of WAN link is not all that uncommon. So it's
definitely a consumer thing.

[1]

Regards,
Rob
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