experchange > slackware

Nollaig MacKenzie (07-08-19, 06:14 AM)
Good = pretty powerful 64 bit, and long lasting.
Something like a Mac Mini.

Must not be noisy.

Doesn't necessarily have to come with Slackware
installed, but, how shall I say, comes willing
to let me install it.

TIA, N.
Henrik Carlqvist (07-08-19, 08:22 AM)
On Sun, 07 Jul 2019 21:14:00 -0700, Nollaig MacKenzie wrote:
> Good = pretty powerful 64 bit, and long lasting.
> Something like a Mac Mini.
> Must not be noisy.
> Doesn't necessarily have to come with Slackware installed, but, how
> shall I say, comes willing to let me install it.


It sounds to me as if you would like something silent and small but still
powerful and this might be contradictive as more power means more heat
which might need more noisy fans. In my experience it is easiest to
install Slackware on machines which you are able to put into legacy boot
mode in the CMOS setup.

I prefer to build my machines from components myself, selecting CPU, RAM,
motherboard, chassis, powersupply, CPU fan, DVD, HDD and possibly
graphics adaptor exactly as I want them.

Things to look out for when choosing or building a machine for Slackware
14.2 which now is somewhat dated:

1) Is the machine possible to boot with legacy boot instead of UEFI?

2) You might have to download, compile and install a newer kernel module
for your network adapter. If so,th his will require another working
machine.

3) It is easier to install Slackware on a HDD or SDD with a SATA
interface than those nvme sticks.

regards Henrik
Bubulcus Industrius (07-08-19, 09:50 AM)
Nollaig MacKenzie wrote on 7/8/19 6:14 AM:
> Good = pretty powerful 64 bit, and long lasting.
> Something like a Mac Mini.
> Must not be noisy.
> Doesn't necessarily have to come with Slackware
> installed, but, how shall I say, comes willing
> to let me install it.
> TIA, N.


If we are talking tower, I've been happy with several Dell machines in the last
decade.
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