experchange > linux.hardware

wexfordpress (04-12-16, 09:56 PM)
I have an old Linksys router. I want a router that is linux friendly and easy to configure for Slackware Linux.

Any suggestions?

John C.
root (04-13-16, 01:03 AM)
wexfordpress <john> wrote:
> I have an old Linksys router. I want a router that is linux friendly and easy to configure for Slackware Linux.
> Any suggestions?
> John C.


As far as configuring goes I have used Dlink, Linksys, Cisco, Belkin,
Netgear, and Asus routers and they are all about the same.

Choose your router for performance reasons. You might also consider
whether the router is compatible with dd-wrt if you want to
ditch factory firmware.
Sylvain Robitaille (04-14-16, 11:34 PM)
On 2016-04-12, wexfordpress wrote:

> I have an old Linksys router. I want a router that is linux friendly
> and easy to configure for Slackware Linux.
> Any suggestions?


A router's "job" is to send data packets from point A to point B.
It has no sense of what OS (let alone what variant of an OS) the
packets are coming from or going to. If you're looking at replacing
the Linksys router only because it's "old", my suggestion is don't.
If you have a different reason, the router you want will be whichever
one solves the problem you're looking to solve, regardless of the
computers around it. I can't offer any better suggestion than that,
I'm afraid, as you haven't indicated that anything is wrong with your
current router.

For the record, my own "router" is itself a Slackware Linux system.
Can't get more "Linux friendly" than that!
andrew.williams (04-15-16, 04:08 PM)
On Tuesday, April 12, 2016 at 9:56:34 PM UTC+2, wexfordpress wrote:
> I have an old Linksys router. I want a router that is linux friendly and easy to configure for Slackware Linux.
> Any suggestions?
> John C.


As the other respondents said, all routers are compatible.

Reasons to buy a new router:
- You have a faster connection and the old router is not up to it.
- Known security holes (spend a few minutes looking for reports of such, look to see if you can download newer microcode from Linksys).
- IPV6, an old one may support it badly or not at all.
- a new one may be far more energy efficient.

Reasons not to buy a new router:
- Some of the new ones have more vulnerabilities than a sieve has holes.
- Why fix it if it ain't broke?

My router is years old, I have the "newest" microcode loaded and I have seen no reports of vulnerabilities. My *provider* is just starting to roll out IPV6 support. !!

ymmv.
wexfordpress (07-06-16, 02:23 AM)
On Friday, April 15, 2016 at 10:08:46 AM UTC-4, andrew....@t-online.de wrote:
[..]
> - Why fix it if it ain't broke?
> My router is years old, I have the "newest" microcode loaded and I have seen no reports of vulnerabilities. My *provider* is just starting to roll out IPV6 support. !!
> ymmv.


Another reason: the old router malfunctions.I replaced my old Linksys Router for this reason. I bought another Linksys with the same model number except for the suffix. The router runs Linux inside but all instructions were for other OS. So I attached all the wiring and never looked at the instructions. It works like a charm locally and wirelessly.

I am afraid to breathe on it for fear that something will go wrong.

Thanks for the lively discussion.

John Culleton
19438 (08-07-16, 12:15 PM)
Most routers run a Linux derivative operating system. As for configuring them almost all use a web page available from any modern web browser. SSH (terminal) access is also commonly available from the router & is part of Linux.
In short, Routers are OS agnostic.
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