experchange > learn.c-c++

Mike819 (09-01-18, 04:54 PM)
For a tutorial, what are the best and easiest books to read on C++ 11, C++ 14, and C++ 17?

Thank you,
Mike
Barry Schwarz (09-02-18, 02:37 AM)
On Sat, 1 Sep 2018 07:54:25 -0700 (PDT), "Mike819"
<ashos.owner> wrote:

>For a tutorial, what are the best and easiest books to read on C++ 11, C++ 14, and C++ 17?


You do realize the two criteria are not necessarily compatible.
😉 Good Guy 😉 (09-02-18, 02:48 AM)
On 01/09/2018 15:54, Mike819 wrote:
> For a tutorial, what are the best and easiest books to read on C++ 11, C++ 14, and C++ 17?
> Thank you,
> Mike


First tell us how much do you know about C++? If you are just starting
then there is no point in selecting any version of C++. You just need to
get a good compiler and any latest book and start reading it from page
to page and do all the examples. New features of C++14 and C++17 will
come to you as you as you continue to do your research outside of the
book you are reading. There is another newsgroup where people will try
to help but you need to expect out-of-topics from time to time. There
are [many] trolls every where.

Why C++ in particular? Why not C# and Windows Forms? It is better than
C, or C++ and Microsoft docs are quite good. Also YouTubers spend all
their time doing videos on C# rather than C or C++.

If, however, you are already an accomplished C++ programmer than the
only way to read about latest developments in C++ is to read the
Standard document from the Standard Setters.

Please ask this question on: <comp.lang.c++> They can give links to
important documents on C++.
Stefan Ram (09-02-18, 04:09 AM)
"Mike819" <ashos.owner> writes:
>For a tutorial, what are the best and easiest books to read
>on C++ 11, C++ 14, and C++ 17?


to be read in the order given as given below by a beginner:

"Programming: Principles and Practice Using C++" by BJARNE STROUSTRUP
"C++ Primer", fifth edition by BARBARA MOO et al
"The C++ programming language", fourth edition by BJARNE STROUSTRUP
A Tour of C++ by BJARNE STROUSTRUP
C++17 - The Complete Guide - Nicolai Josuttis
"Effective Modern C++"
C++ Templates: The Complete Guide by DAVID VANDERVOORDE et al
The C++ Core Guidelines (online)
The C++ Standard Library: A Tutorial and Reference (2nd Edition)

Take care to always find and get the /newest editions/
of all books!

Then you can read older books, but be aware that some
advices of them now are obsolete. (But when you have read
the above source you will hopefully already often be able to
judge this by yourself.) Still they a worth to know:

"Effective C++"
"More Effective C++"
"Exceptional C++"
"More Exceptional C++"
"Modern C++-Design"

For example, I am not sure whether one of the more recent
books treads exception safety so extensively as the
"exceptional" books by Herb Sutter.

Also watch all the cppcon talks by Herb Sutter!
Manfred (09-05-18, 11:06 PM)
On 9/2/2018 2:48 AM, 😉 Good Guy 😉 wrote:
> On 01/09/2018 15:54, Mike819 wrote:
>> For a tutorial, what are the best and easiest books to read on C++ 11, C++ 14, and C++ 17?
>> Thank you,
>> Mike


You may also look at:
Mike819 (09-18-18, 02:03 PM)
On Wednesday, September 5, 2018 at 5:06:14 PM UTC-4, Manfred wrote:
> On 9/2/2018 2:48 AM, 😉 Good Guy 😉 wrote:
> You may also look at:
>


Thanks, I've ordered many of the books listed at stackoverflow! I've just received 8 of them with more coming in the mail, I'm sure.

Anyway, I'm looking for other tips on how to use this exciting cache of books.

Of these books, the one I like the most is titled "Programming Principles and Practice Using C++" by Bjarne Stroustrup. I like it because it gives information about much of the C++ language. Sadly, the book appears very vaguein its presentation. I.E.: The book covers each topic using many pages when it should just use a paragraph or two. The book also discusses concepts that are boring because any hardened programmer already knows the concepts.

I also found another book that I ordered before reading the above web page.The book is titled "C++ Primer" by Lippman, Lajoie, and Moo. This book is exactly like the above Stroustrup book in that it drags on and on when it could explain the information in just a paragraph or two.

The truth is to study C++ 11 (for Visual Studio 2015) I find the following sequence of C++ videos to be much much better:



Some of these video tutorials discuss "just the new features" of C++11 and not the C++ 98 basic concepts etc. (For example, the book discusses the concept of a class in great detail which Bo Qian's videos do not.) In comparison, the above list of books lacks Bo Quin's style.

I want to use these books as a tool and not to just collect dust on a bookshelf. What do you think?

Thank you,
Mike

P.S.: I don't know if I will ever be able to use any of the books on the above web page. I can try to use the index page of the books to find information, but I could probably more easily do searches on Google!
Francis Glassborow (09-24-18, 02:38 PM)
On 18/09/2018 13:03, Mike819 wrote:
[..]
> Thank you,
> Mike
> P.S.: I don't know if I will ever be able to use any of the books on the above web page. I can try to use the index page of the books to find information, but I could probably more easily do searches on Google


PPP using C++ was written as a university textbook for students who
might know very little about programming and often were bugged my
erroneous learning earlier in their lives.

C++ Primer is also a book for those with relatively little programming
background.

Books deserve to the critiqued against the needs of their target
readership. IMO both books are excellent for those they are intended for.

Francis
ruben safir (10-16-18, 03:52 AM)
On 9/24/18 8:38 AM, Francis Glassborow wrote:
> C++ Primer is also a book for those with relatively little programming
> background.


not really
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