experchange > linux.hardware

Moe Trin (11-03-16, 10:14 PM)
On Thu, 3 Nov 2016, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mageia, in article
<nvfbjp$58u$1>, TJ wrote:

>Moe Trin wrote:


>> Actually, for many years, competitive target shooters [...] MAY wear
>> yellow tinted glasses [...], but that is to increase the contrast of
>> the black rings on the white paper target.


>My brother likes to wear yellow-tinted glasses when tractor-cultivating
>young corn where other weed control measures have been less than
>successful. He says they make the corn stand out from the weeds.


Similar here, with weeds in the lawn. We can't use chemical weed
control agents in the lawn for most of the year, because the average
temperatures are well above the limits listed on the labels. See
(section
IV). If you look at the label on products like "Weed-Be-Gone" or "Weed
Stop for Lawns", you'll find that they shouldn't be used when temps
average above 85F/29C or 90F/32C), and the overnight _low_ in July may
be above that, never mind the average. That means weed control the
old-fashioned way - feeding and watering to create a dense lawn (not
possible here) to crowd out the weeks, or walking the lawn and pulling
the weeds manually. Most weeds are easy to see, but some (such as
oxalis) are similar in color (but not texture) until they bloom. Of
course, the other alternative is no lawn (my front and side yards are
light colored crushed stone), or artificial grass.

Old guy
The Real Bev (11-04-16, 06:49 AM)
On 11/03/2016 12:07 AM, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
> On 03/11/16 06:46, The Real Bev wrote:
> IN the days of B & W photography, yellow or green filters were used to
> darken blue skies, in particular to increase contrast with white clouds,
> which stayed lighter.


RED filters. The effect was unnatural, but very slick.

> I suspect the same is true of white snow and blue sky.,


Theory has it that the eye is more sensitive to yellow light because of
our yellow sun.
The Real Bev (11-04-16, 06:50 AM)
On 11/03/2016 05:47 AM, TJ wrote:
> On 11/02/2016 08:19 PM, Moe Trin wrote:
> My brother likes to wear yellow-tinted glasses when tractor-cultivating
> young corn where other weed control measures have been less than
> successful. He says they make the corn stand out from the weeds.


Orange glasses REALLY make green stand out. Creepily so.
The Natural Philosopher (11-04-16, 07:42 AM)
On 04/11/16 04:49, The Real Bev wrote:
> On 11/03/2016 12:07 AM, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
> RED filters. The effect was unnatural, but very slick.


Red made things VERY contrasty.
Yellow or green was a lot better - more like a polarising filter.
William Unruh (11-04-16, 11:41 AM)
On 2016-11-04, The Real Bev <bashley101> wrote:
> On 11/03/2016 12:07 AM, The Natural Philosopher wrote:
> RED filters. The effect was unnatural, but very slick.
> Theory has it that the eye is more sensitive to yellow light because of
> our yellow sun.


More likely because the visible band is what water is transparent at,
and eyes developed underwater and are filled with water.
The Natural Philosopher (11-04-16, 12:00 PM)
On 04/11/16 09:41, William Unruh wrote:
> On 2016-11-04, The Real Bev <bashley101> wrote:
> More likely because the visible band is what water is transparent at,
> and eyes developed underwater and are filled with water. ISTR that eyes developed more than once.


Insects are particularly happy with UV.
J. Clarke (11-07-16, 01:42 AM)
In article <nvebqe0ljs>,
cgibbs says...
> On 2016-11-03, Moe Trin <ibuprofin> wrote:
> I've been phasing in LED replacements for the 50-watt PAR20 halogens
> in our pot lights. (They consume about 7 watts for the same amount
> of light, and don't get hellishly hot like the halogens.) The 2700K
> models (warm white) work pretty well. At least until you dim them.
> The newer ones will dim decently without flickering, but they don't
> get redder like the halogens do. This is a bit disconcerting,
> especially if you have one of each on the same circuit.


The latest generation of LED bulbs from Philips
does a pretty job of emulating the reddening of
incandescents. It's not perfect but it's good
enough. Now the question is what I do with the
two in the chandelier that don't do that (I've
been replacing them on an attrition basis).
J. Clarke (11-07-16, 01:46 AM)
In article <nvcpl7$4vv$1>,
bliss says...
> On 11/02/2016 05:38 AM, TJ wrote:
> Well when possible that is fine. When I was younger I pursued
> physical activity. After I was in my 46th year that became impossible
> and now at 79+ I am barely able to ambulate and carry home a few lbs
> of food which I must then find the energy to cook. I also have had
> injuries or simple wearing out of joints to contend with.


I don't have any trouble watching TV then
falling asleep (or reading on a tablet or
whatever). My trouble is that I wake up after
about 4 hours and the reason for that is
something that I don't think changing light
bulbs is going to fix.
J. Clarke (11-07-16, 01:54 AM)
In article <nvg3fe21fjd>,
cgibbs says...
> On 2016-11-03, Carlos E.R. <robin_listas> wrote:
> Our police cars have both red and blue lights. Again, very intense.
> And don't get me started on headlights. When I become king, I will
> ban HID lights from cars, and bring back the old standards for headlight
> aiming and intensity.
> It's a bit of consolation that I've figured out how to aim my side
> mirrors so that if I'm being followed by someone with bright headlights,
> they get a dose of their own medicine. It discourages tailgating, too.


I suspect HID is on the way out--LED brings too
much good stuff to the party.

On the other hand, don't really expect "the old
standards" to make a comeback. Florida used to
inspect headlight aiming. The gadget they used
was mainly a way for some seller of gadgets to
bilk the government--didn't matter where the
headlights were pointed, the guy would jiggle
the thing for a while and you'd pass.
Charlie Gibbs (11-07-16, 04:42 AM)
On 2016-11-06, J. Clarke <j.clarke.873638> wrote:

[..]
> bilk the government--didn't matter where the
> headlights were pointed, the guy would jiggle
> the thing for a while and you'd pass.


We used to have vehicle inspection stations here in B.C. until they were
dismantled around 1982 as a "cost-saving measure". Everyone took for
granted that you'd be flunked on your headlights - and near each testing
station was a service station that had the same equipment and which would
adjust your lights quickly and cheaply.

Back then we were taught that it was rude and dangerous to drive with
high beams in the presence of other traffic. New cars' daytime running
lights - now mandated by the federal government - are often implemented
using high beams. It's just one more of the kind of reversals that
politicians are famous for.
The Natural Philosopher (11-07-16, 10:01 AM)
On 06/11/16 23:42, J. Clarke wrote:
> Now the question is what I do with the
> two in the chandelier that don't do that (I've
> been replacing them on an attrition basis).


Exchange them with ones that are in silly places - the light in the
cupboard etc.

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