experchange > linux.hardware

The Natural Philosopher (11-03-16, 09:07 AM)
On 03/11/16 06:46, The Real Bev wrote:
> My ski goggles are light yellow, and after a while the snow looks white
> again through them. Even though I only ski in bright sunlight, I've
> never noticed excessive brightness until I take the goggles off.


IN the days of B & W photography, yellow or green filters were used to
darken blue skies, in particular to increase contrast with white clouds,
which stayed lighter.

I suspect the same is true of white snow and blue sky.,
Ikke (11-03-16, 10:32 AM)
Bobbie Sellers wrote:

> Hi guys and gals,
> Sad news but remediable. Should be spread around...
> <https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/blue-leds-light-up-your-brain/?WT.mc_id=SA_HLTH_20161101>
> DEA is going to be after this deleterious stimulant. ;^)
> bliss


That isn't news at all. Stories like that (I don't call these reports) are
circulating already a long time. Somewhat the opposite also circulates: some
people with sleeping disorders are advised a light therapy: sit in front of
a very strong (rather blueish white light) for about 30 min, then dim the
light. The simulation of sunset is supposed to get to sleep easier.
All this is mostly particular cases, I suspect most of it is just a
"placebo" effect.
BTW, I consider this the biggest unsolved problem in medicine: why do
placebo's work????

Herman Viaene
William Unruh (11-03-16, 12:11 PM)
On 2016-11-03, Bobbie Sellers <bliss> wrote:
> On 11/02/2016 08:39 PM, Charlie Gibbs wrote:
> Try adjusting the gamma in System Setting/Hardware/Monitor toward red
> and away from blue and green.


There exist programs to do this automatically at night (using the
system clock) Right now I cannot remember the name of any of them.

I had it running on my system for a while and then forgot about it.
Probably on there somewhere still.
Caver1 (11-03-16, 12:54 PM)
On 11/03/2016 06:11 AM, William Unruh wrote:
> On 2016-11-03, Bobbie Sellers <bliss> wrote:
> There exist programs to do this automatically at night (using the
> system clock) Right now I cannot remember the name of any of them.
> I had it running on my system for a while and then forgot about it.
> Probably on there somewhere still.


F.lux is one.
TJ (11-03-16, 02:47 PM)
On 11/02/2016 08:19 PM, Moe Trin wrote:
[..]
> large bill (or equal) to keep the sun out of the way though. Yellow
> tinted glasses and bright sunlight don't work well together.
> Old guy

My brother likes to wear yellow-tinted glasses when tractor-cultivating
young corn where other weed control measures have been less than
successful. He says they make the corn stand out from the weeds.

TJ
Bobbie Sellers (11-03-16, 04:52 PM)
On 11/03/2016 03:11 AM, William Unruh wrote:
> On 2016-11-03, Bobbie Sellers <bliss> wrote:
> There exist programs to do this automatically at night (using the
> system clock) Right now I cannot remember the name of any of them.
> I had it running on my system for a while and then forgot about it.
> Probably on there somewhere still.


f.lux is referred to in the URL I posted but it is not compliled
for my OS so I simply went to the simplest (for me) correction.
Back in my early Amiga OS days I regularly messed with color settings
to off the overscan/interlace settings I used.

bliss
William Unruh (11-03-16, 05:22 PM)
On 2016-11-03, Bobbie Sellers <bliss> wrote:
> On 11/03/2016 03:11 AM, William Unruh wrote:
> f.lux is referred to in the URL I posted but it is not compliled
> for my OS so I simply went to the simplest (for me) correction.


xflux for Linux

Not sure what you mean by "not compiled for my OS?
Bobbie Sellers (11-03-16, 05:36 PM)
On 11/03/2016 08:22 AM, William Unruh wrote:
> On 2016-11-03, Bobbie Sellers <bliss> wrote:
> xflux for Linux
> Not sure what you mean by "not compiled for my OS?


It is not in the repositories I use but I will search on xflux when I
have the time.
>> Back in my early Amiga OS days I regularly messed with color settings
>> to off the overscan/interlace settings I used.


bliss
David W. Hodgins (11-03-16, 07:11 PM)
On Thu, 03 Nov 2016 06:11:47 -0400, William Unruh <unruh> wrote:

> There exist programs to do this automatically at night (using the
> system clock) Right now I cannot remember the name of any of them.


I use redshift/redshift-gtk. Does make the screen much less annoying
to use.

Regards, Dave Hodgins
William Unruh (11-03-16, 07:19 PM)
On 2016-11-03, Bobbie Sellers <bliss> wrote:
> On 11/03/2016 08:22 AM, William Unruh wrote:
> It is not in the repositories I use but I will search on xflux when I
> have the time.




It is apparently a pre-compiled (ie not open source) program. It uses
randr to adjust the screen colour temperature at appropriate times of
the day, as defined by your location on earth.
Carlos E.R. (11-03-16, 08:20 PM)
On 2016-11-03 07:45, Mike Spencer wrote:
> Charlie Gibbs <cgibbs> writes:
>> Hah! They can have it. Now I have scientific justification for my
>> hatred of the blue-LED craze. (Aside from my eyes' inability to
>> focus on those wavelengths.)

> I think the focus thing is true for everybody. You're just clueful
> enough to have noticed. ;-)


Police cars on my city have blue light on their roof, very intense. I
happened to be driving behind one at night and had to increase the
distance: they blind me. Worse than headlights.

On the other hand, I don't have problems with computer displays. I just
set the monitor to "warm". No need to change it during the day with
software: I want whites to remain constant.
Charlie Gibbs (11-03-16, 09:24 PM)
On 2016-11-03, Bobbie Sellers <bliss> wrote:

> On 11/02/2016 08:39 PM, Charlie Gibbs wrote:
> Try adjusting the gamma in System Setting/Hardware/Monitor toward red
> and away from blue and green.
> Might help.


I don't have much trouble with monitors. It's all those gratuitous
brilliant blue LEDs (many of them flashing) which manufacturers insist
on putting on everything these days. Once when I was doing sound for
a play, the board's pilot light was a blue LED that was so bright that
I had to cover it with three layers of masking tape so that I could
see anything else in the darkened hall (including the board itself).
Charlie Gibbs (11-03-16, 09:34 PM)
On 2016-11-03, Carlos E.R. <robin_listas> wrote:

> On 2016-11-03 07:45, Mike Spencer wrote:
> Police cars on my city have blue light on their roof, very intense. I
> happened to be driving behind one at night and had to increase the
> distance: they blind me. Worse than headlights.


Our police cars have both red and blue lights. Again, very intense.

And don't get me started on headlights. When I become king, I will
ban HID lights from cars, and bring back the old standards for headlight
aiming and intensity.

It's a bit of consolation that I've figured out how to aim my side
mirrors so that if I'm being followed by someone with bright headlights,
they get a dose of their own medicine. It discourages tailgating, too.
William Unruh (11-03-16, 10:02 PM)
On 2016-11-03, Carlos E.R. <robin_listas> wrote:
> On 2016-11-03 07:45, Mike Spencer wrote:
> Police cars on my city have blue light on their roof, very intense. I
> happened to be driving behind one at night and had to increase the
> distance: they blind me. Worse than headlights.
> On the other hand, I don't have problems with computer displays. I just
> set the monitor to "warm". No need to change it during the day with
> software: I want whites to remain constant.


Your "eyes" are tremendously adapatable, and readjust their set point
for what "white" is. Under incandecents, "whites" are decideddly
reddish. Under Flourescents, green (You have surely taken pictures under
flourescents). But your brain renormalises its response so white stays
white.

Now, if you are in a green lit room, and your screen is "warm" it will
probably look very reddish.
Moe Trin (11-03-16, 10:12 PM)
On Wed, 2 Nov 2016, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mageia, in article
<nvemfo$14f$1>, The Real Bev wrote:

>Moe Trin wrote:



>My ski goggles are light yellow, and after a while the snow looks white
>again through them. Even though I only ski in bright sunlight, I've
>never noticed excessive brightness until I take the goggles off.


Main problem I've noticed is when you either take them off, or get a
glimpse of the sun around the glasses - especially with older eyes, it
takes some time for the eyes to readjust to the light levels.

>I just buy them at yard sales for a buck -- the previous owner got to
>choose he color.


All of mine are prescription (and hardened), so they are made to order
and cost a bit more.

Old guy

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