experchange > comp.programming

lothar.behrens (01-15-06, 07:51 PM)
Hi,

sorry, just to get more readers may have this disk :-)

I have an old book (Turbo Vision ISBN: 3-89319-156-9) containing a
diskette. But I cannot access it any more and like to have the
contents.

Does any here have this disk or can make a zip file of it's contents ?

I need the idxfile.tpu+idxfile.pas which I am using in old sources.

Thanks, Lothar
gswork (01-16-06, 10:41 AM)
lothar.behrens wrote:

> Hi,
> sorry, just to get more readers may have this disk :-)
> I have an old book (Turbo Vision ISBN: 3-89319-156-9) containing a
> diskette. But I cannot access it any more and like to have the
> contents.
> Does any here have this disk or can make a zip file of it's contents ?
> I need the idxfile.tpu+idxfile.pas which I am using in old sources.
> Thanks, Lothar


Have you asked on comp.lang.pascal.borland ?

the chances are slim, but someone there may give you more of an idea.

if the disk itself is seemingly corrupt then there are tools to help
get data off the disk regardless. a google search for the three words
- floppy disk rescue - seemed to show promise.
Randy (01-16-06, 06:32 PM)
lothar.behrens wrote:
> Hi,
> sorry, just to get more readers may have this disk :-)
> I have an old book (Turbo Vision ISBN: 3-89319-156-9) containing a
> diskette. But I cannot access it any more and like to have the
> contents.
> Does any here have this disk or can make a zip file of it's contents ?
> I need the idxfile.tpu+idxfile.pas which I am using in old sources.
> Thanks, Lothar


That ISBN is invalid, BTW. Presumably you meant "Turbo Vision (Version
2.0 Programming Guide)" by Borland:



First of all, any floppy more than about six years old will have
degaussed and will be irreparable. Certainly a disk from a book written
14 years ago is lost forever.

You might contact Borland (or whomever owns them now: Inprise?).

A quick google search for BORLAND "TURBO VISION" might prove useful:










....

Randy
lothar.behrens (01-16-06, 09:46 PM)
Thanks,

I know about tvision.sourceforge.net. I have ported it to be usable
with Open Watcom :-)
This project is a candidate for my C++ project I am working on. But it
takes more time.

Currently I have identified, that only one pice of code will use
TIndexFile, which is from
that disk. I have commented it out and was able to compile it again.

But I got some problems with illegal instructions when run with Windows
2000.
My orginal application - I still have in executable variant - works
well.

Currently I try Free Pascal and/or Dev-Pascal. The code does not
compile under Free
Pascal. It also seems missing App.tpu and the like similarities in
Dev-Pascal.

There may be Free-Vision, but I haven't yet found it on the net.

Regards, Lothar
Michael Wojcik (01-18-06, 05:09 PM)
In article <dqghqo$sg3$1>, Randy <joe> writes:
> First of all, any floppy more than about six years old will have
> degaussed and will be irreparable.


I don't know about 5 1/4" floppies - I have several here but haven't
installed a suitable drive in any of my machines - but this certainly
isn't true of 3 1/2" ones. I just tested ones from 1998, 1996, and
1994, and they're all readable. They've been stored for the past
several years in a plastic box on a bookshelf between two computers -
not exactly archival conditions.

> Certainly a disk from a book written
> 14 years ago is lost forever.


Let's see what's in the box in the basement... oh, here's one from
August 1992. Readable. A 720KB 3 1/2" from 1994 - readable. Another
from 1994 - readable. A set of WordPerfect installation disks from
1991 ... drum roll please ... readable!
Randy (01-18-06, 09:52 PM)
Michael Wojcik wrote:
> In article <dqghqo$sg3$1>, Randy <joe> writes: ....
>>Certainly a disk from a book written 14 years ago is lost forever.


About 4 years ago I found that *all* my 5 1/4 floppies from ca.
1988-1993 had degaussed (13-18 years of age). I've heard comparable
experiences from peers, but I'm unable to find an authoritative source
who has systematically quantified floppy longevity. Presumably, it
varies widely due to handling, original media quality, and type of floppy.

Remember, original 5 1/4 media was junk. A large fraction of floppies
of that vintage were DOA right out of the box. None came preformatted,
presumably because everyone knew it was necessary to format in order to
detect and circumvent bad sectors on new media. Back then, NOBODY was
stupid enough to use "diskcopy", which did a physical copy from A to B,
since B almost certainly had bad spots that would not store the data.

I have no old 3 1/2 floppies, so I can't say how long they live. Since
they were clad in thick plastic and had a spring loaded metal door to
protect the read area, it stands to reason that they will live longer
than the 5 1/4, which was clad in thin plastic and had only a loose
paper sleeve to protect the read area.

> Let's see what's in the box in the basement... oh, here's one from
> August 1992. Readable. A 720KB 3 1/2" from 1994 - readable. Another
> from 1994 - readable. A set of WordPerfect installation disks from
> 1991 ... drum roll please ... readable!


From what I've heard in this thread, the book in question was (or is
comparable to) "A Programmer's Guide to Turbo Vision - Book and Disk",
ISBN 020162401X, 1993, by Ertl et al:



It included a 5 1/4 inch floppy.

Randy
Logan Shaw (01-18-06, 11:10 PM)
Randy wrote:
> Remember, original 5 1/4 media was junk. A large fraction of floppies
> of that vintage were DOA right out of the box. None came preformatted,
> presumably because everyone knew it was necessary to format in order to
> detect and circumvent bad sectors on new media.


Also could be because they didn't know whether to format it for Apple II,
IBM PC, Atari 800, Commodore 64, or TI99-4/A, all of which mostly used
the same type of floppy disk but used different formats.

- Logan
anoneds (01-22-06, 10:53 PM)
Randy wrote:
[..]
> detect and circumvent bad sectors on new media. Back then, NOBODY was
> stupid enough to use "diskcopy", which did a physical copy from A to B,
> since B almost certainly had bad spots that would not store the data.


I have about 300 5.25" floppies dating all the way back to 1982 that
are readable. I usually go through them once or twice a year (looking
for that little snippet of code or a forgotten app), and I might find a
disk with some bad sectors in the bunch. In a wooden trunk under my
computer table - they were stored "on edge" in their sleeves, some in
boxes.

Sorry to hear you've had so many problems. I've had more problems with
3.5" HD disks (not 3.5" 720k disks, which I also use).

BTW: Diskcopy was fine... as long as you did a VERIFY ON...
(VERIFY OFF was a stupid default, but not many disk systems did READ
after WRITE that I know of. IBM could do it, ATARI and TI did do it).

Yes, I need to index my disks. Everytime I start, I wind up moving and
losing track of where I was...
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